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Thursday, January 13, 2011

More on "Whatever is Now..."

All day yesterday after my blog post I kept thinking of ways to better describe what I started describing yesterday morning. I feel this is a very important thing to understand because this can dictate my emotions and behaviors.

Yesterday I said that, "whatever is now is forever". With that type of mind set I think you can see why change is difficult because you are quite literally changing the perception of forever.

Where I think this concept affects me the most is starting new things. Come to think of it, it just isn't starting new things but also restarting things I have done. I think about my interest in the racing game iRacing. When I am fixated on that game it will be the only game I play or think about. However, if I take a break from it, any little break at all and another game strikes my interest, I will have no interest in iRacing. Then, whatever game is the new interest will remain until the cycle repeats itself and I go back to iRacing.

Maybe everyone shares this trait in a way, but for me it is truly an all or nothing system. This is one of the reasons why I have so many games that I have bought that I have not started. If there isn't that spark to start something I will struggle with starting. To start something new, in my mind, is to erase something that already is.

This is just a modern day struggle I have with transition and change. In school I hated the top of the hour as one subject went to another (except the spelling hour; I hated spelling). With each change came, well, change and change is bad. With each change though came a change of my focus and when I focus on something I have a pinpoint focus and it becomes everything. Granted I was able to make the adjustment, but I hear from more and more parents that those minor changes in the day often end in a serious behavior. What can be done about this? I don't have that answer, but I hope the concept of understanding that people on the spectrum may have the mindset that whatever is now is forever will help you see why those minor changes can have such a major impact.

1 comment:

  1. Aaron, I read a blogpost on Not Exactly Rocket Science right after reading this one, and couldn't help but think the two issues could somehow be related:

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2011/01/13/writing-about-exam-worries-for-10-minutes-improves-student-results/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NotRocketScience+%28Not+Exactly+Rocket+Science%29

    Maybe there's a possible solution in there as well? Does preparations, gradual changes, doing mental exercises help at all?

    Or I may be completely wrong. It was just a thought ;-)

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